Practice Research

Convenors: Charlotte Crofts (University of the West of England) and John Twycross (Oxford Brookes)

Members

Practice Research within the field of film, television and screen studies in an established academic area which has demonstrated an impactful contribution to the field, both within the REF and research council funded projects. This group focuses on building on these foundations, exploring how screen media practice research can be developed within BAFTSS. The group aims to disseminate practice research and evaluate how practice can contribute new knowledge to the field in terms of its significance, originality and rigour. The group also explores innovative methods of academic dissemination and peer review; as well as the potential of practice research for public engagement and impact.

The SIG is linked to Screenworks and to the Journal of Media Practice. Screenworks is a peer-reviewed online publication of practice research in film and screen media, edited by Charlotte Crofts (Associate Professor Filmmaking at UWE) and Associate Editors Steve Presence (UWE), Nariman Massoumi (University of Bristol) and Alex Nevill (UWE). Screenworks publishes practice research that produces new knowledge in Communication, Media and Cultural Studies, Art and Design, Performing Arts and related fields. We offer a forum for the dissemination and discussion of practice research that includes space for reflection on research contexts. Work is published alongside a research statement, which offers a ‘route map’ of the research process, together with two anonymous reviews, which provide critical feedback on both the work itself and its research context. What is unique about Screenworks is that the work is subject to academic peer review, just as an academic journal article would be, thus providing evidence of the impact, significance, originality and rigour of the practice as research. In addition, we operate an open review policy, where peer reviews are published alongside the research statement so that the review process is transparent. Our intention is to create a supportive, yet rigorous research environment for the academic community researching screen media through practice, whilst at the same time engaging with wider audiences.

The Journal of Media Practice is edited by Julian McDougall and Neal White (Bournemouth University). Members of the SIG are on the Editorial Board. The Journal provides an international forum for research into and through media practice and the circulation of practice-based media / arts research. The journal adopts an interdisciplinary approach and seeks to foster collaboration and exchanges between academic, professional and creative practitioners, including the dissemination of work funded by such partnerships. In addition, the journal aims to contribute to the development of both integrated and diverse forms of research mediation, facilitate equitable relationships between media practice and theory and provide a critical bridge between the written article and the publishing of media practice research in other online media formats. Submissions are invited on all aspects of media / creative / arts practice, policy, aesthetics and pedagogy, with a particular emphasis on the future of media practice. This may include submissions (both written articles and media / art works) relating to emerging issues, discourses, policy, education and the international geopolitics of media practice, with additional emphasis on the problems, challenges and opportunities of interdisciplinary research in the journal’s related fields.

The SIG is also linked to the AHRC Filmmaking Research Network (Principal Investigator Joanna Callaghan (University of Sussex), Co-Investigator Susan Kerrigan (University of Newcastle, Australia). The aim of the network is to develop understanding and consolidate the field of filmmaking research by sharing best practice internationally and developing resources. We will examine how the UK and Australia use filmmaking research to generate new knowledge and will produce resources to improve capacity and research infrastructure. The network will conduct research and knowledge exchange through workshops, visits, meetings, a public screening, conference panels and a survey.  Resources will include a register of films, case studies of best practice, a toolkit, resource lists and a training seminar in reviewing practice research. A special edition of the Journal of Media Practice in 2018 will be dedicated to the project. The Filmmaking Research Network will run for 18 months and will include over 40 members from more than 20 institutions including industry and third sector representatives. The network will stimulate new debates, foster a deeper understanding of filmmaking research and develop resources to sustain the future of the field.

 

Members